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The History of Parliament icon

The History of Parliament

13,788 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

ALCLIFF, William. Constituency Dates Marlborough Apr. 1414 Biography Alcliff was a surety for the appearance of Thomas Heose in the Parliament of 1406, as one of the representatives of Marlborough.C219/10/3.

ASTON, William, of Cornw. Constituency Dates Liskeard 1407 Biography On 18 Dec. 1407, a fortnight after the dissolution of the Gloucester Parliament, Aston stood surety in Chancery for a man from Middlesex.CCR, 1405-9, p. 352.

BITHEWATER, John. Constituency Dates Tavistock Jan. 1390 Biography He was possibly the man who, as John atte Pole, represented Tavistock in the first Parliament of 1388, but otherwise nothing is known of him.

FARINGDON, William. Constituency Dates Weymouth 1402 Biography Nothing else is known of William for certain but he was probably related to Thomas Faringdon*, who was to sit for Wareham in Henry V's first Parliament.

FERET, Adam. Constituency Dates New Shoreham 1417 New Shoreham 1426 New Shoreham 1431 Biography Unidentified. He may have been related to William Feret†, who represented Lewes in the same Parliament of 1426.

British History Online icon

British History Online

30,091 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

1651 An Act for a Seal of the Parliament of the Commonwealth of England. January, 1651 [22 January, 1650/1. ] Use of Parliament Seal . Be it Enacted by this present Parliament, That the Seal Engraven with the Arms of

7 22 January 1655 Monday, the 22d of January, 1654. Parliament dissolved. HIS Highness the Lord Protector being in the Painted Chamber; and the Parliament, with their Speaker, by his Command, attending him there; was pleased to dissolve this Parliament.

the Interval of Parliament, shall be in the Disposition and Ordering of the said Council, for the Ends aforesaid, until a Parliament be assembled; and then the Disposal of the said Forces to be made by the Parliament, as they

of this present Parliament. [Rot. Parl. 12. C. II. p. 1. nu. 1. ] The Parliament begun 3d Nov. 16 Car. 1. dissolved.; Lords and Commons now sitting declared to be the Two Houses of Parliament.; This Parliament may be

the Parliament, being the 21th Day of May 1642, and likewise that those who will be hereafter made Peers or Lords of Parliament, shall not sit or vote in the Parliament of England, without Consent of both Houses of Parliament;

John Strype's Survey of London Online icon

John Strype's Survey of London Online

388 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

in their Act of Parliament, we must have admitted, that the lessening of it never so little might have been interpreted a Violation of their Property. But this is not the Case here, the Act of Parliament having vested them

Knights of the Privy Chamber. The Chief Secretary. The Vice Chamberlain. Knights of the Garter. Comptroller and Treasurer. Barons of Parliament. Bishops. { The Lord Chamberlain of the Queens { Household. The Lord Admiral of England . Marquesses younger Sons.

Years This Parliament was adjourned to Westminster , amongst the black Monks, and ended in the King's Palace there, the 14th of August , at Nine of the Clock in the Night; and was therefore called the Black Parliament .

in England , that the same Session of Parliament hath Imprisoned, Fined, or any otherwise disseized or destroyed any Man, for obeying or executing the Laws, Ordinances, or Orders of the same Parliament. And there are many Ordinances in Force,

settle the Nation in a way of Free Parliament, and to offer what they conceive conducing thereto, and to mediate Agreement and Peace between all Parties, in order to a Free Parliament. And the Commissioners impowered to confer with the

Victoria County History icon

Victoria County History

2,031 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

Ivry in France , to which house the church was appropriated. It was dissolved with other alien priories by the Parliament of Leicester in 1415 , and was at first granted to Joan, the queen-dowager of England . Blomefield, Hist.

help. Parliament was asked to provide money for repairing the city and for paying off loans incurred during the military crisis. 52 During the second Civil War the city and its garrison remained steadfast for parliament. In April 1648 parliament

IN THE ARUNDEL CASTLE ARCHIVES USED IN THIS VOLUME A Accounts AP Acts of Parliament, Bills, and Associated Documents C Correspondence D Deeds DB Papers of Duke Bernard (d. 1975 ) FA The Fitzalan Chapel Case FC Papers formerly at

in parliament. Sir William 's candidature was backed by Lord Scrope, Lord President of the Council in the North. Both men were re-elected apparently unchallenged in 1626 and 1628, but the Alfords failed in the male line before another parliament

sitting in 1413 , Calne between 1390 and 1413 -14 with a single sitting in the second Parliament of 1399. Until the second Parliament of 1421 representatives of Chippenham only sat thrice after 1389-90 , of Cricklade only twice after

British Newspapers 1600-1900 icon

British Newspapers 1600-1900

1,122,136 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

spleen, (yn weddol aml) platform, ei politics, carte-de-viste, soft Denbigh stuff, cheers, Jackdaws, concert, cliques, (hoff air) Independent member of Parliament, sly, bowio, Highness, j urymen game hunt, retreato. consultio, blunder," ac yn olaf y geiriau hyn yn y frawddeg

I LLYTHYR 0 EIDDO GORONWY OWEN. [Daeth i'n Ilawy Dlythyr canlynol a ysgrifenwyd-gan y bardd enwog Goronwy Owen at ei geinder, Mr. John Rowlands, Clegir Mawr, Mon. Y mae yn bresenol yn meddiant Mr. Richard.Williams, Birkenhead, yr hwn sydd

yn nghalonau ei ganlyn- wyr. Yr 'dwyf yn bur dawel fy meddwl pe na bu- asai yr un "At of Parliament" yn ein gorfodi i gadw clerigwyr Protestanaidd, ond yn hytrach pe y gadewsid hyn i'r eglwys Gristionagol, na fuasai

yn enedigol o iLaurwot, as yn frawd i'r 0 Parch. David Davies, Pienllan.8 Ar yr 21ain cyiisol, yns 312. Upper Parliament Street, 1erpwl, S yn 67 mlwydd oed, Mies Susannah Davies, y ddiweddaf o ferch-o ed y diweddar Barch. John

talfyriad fy llith) ac mi a ymdrechaf roddi ychydig o hanes yr hyn a welais ac a glywais yn y Parliament yr wyth- nos ddiweddaf. Prydnawn dydd Liun, aethum i Dy yr Argiwyddi, a gwelwn gyfnewidiad mawr yn ymddangosiadfront beech

Board of Longitude icon

Board of Longitude

17 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

the Act's passage through Parliament. Barrington's materials show that the passage of this Act was not easy. He was clearly amassing evidence to justify the Board's actions and decisions in the face of a sceptical Parliament; sceptical both as to

the Board of Longitude and other nautical interests, and is said to have been printed by order of Act of Parliament on 9 December 1768. Similar forms can be seen in volume RGO 14/67 . Forms like this one were

funds to that purpose and later the money raised through the sale of Naval stores as well. The King and Parliament had to approve increases to the limits set on these funds, as well as the establishment or increase of

group of Commissioners and watchmakers in 1765. Such discovery was required of him by a RGO 14/1:29rnew Act passed by Parliament in that year, in order to win the great reward. The notes form two parts. There are three sheets

pretensions to a reward from parliament Signed by members of the Committee of the Board of Longitude. Report outlining objections to Mr Mudge's pretensions to a reward from parliament Observations on Mr Mudge's application to parliament for a reward for

House of Commons Parliamentary Papers icon

House of Commons Parliamentary Papers

444,649 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

law, which the faid Earl, being a ./Uz/wr, is not capable of making without the aid of an A£t of Parliament. Cfietefoje your Majefty's molt dutiful and loyal Subjects the faid ^/fo^y Earl of Sfc<z//*jWy, and S»/d/zzfcz Countefs of $w/f£jtf#ry

the ftid Eail's other Sons, the fame cannot effeftually be done, without the Aid and Afliftance of an Act of Parliament • M7 /f r/«re/ore P/m/; Bwr A/«/? £.v«//«W A//7J£Srr, At the humble Requcft of Your Majefty's moft dutiful Subject,

the Age of One and twenty Years, or fooner, if fhe fhould be Enabled, or made Capable by A£t of Parliament, or otherwife, to joyn and fliould joyn, or offer to joyn with the faid Sir /fo#w»?// 7y«/<?,' to fettle

neceffary and rcquifite, at the Colts and Charges of him the faid Sir P/a//W/ 2jrart, to procure art Aft of Parliament, or other Con- veyances or Affufances as Council fhould advife and direct, to enable the faid Afary /Fatten, and

of the Age of Nineteen Years, or thereabouts, the fame caqnot be effected without the Aid of an Act of Parliament; Wherefore your Majefty's moft Dutiful and Loyal Subjects, the faid Sir /fa//we// 2>»?e and Dame Afary his Wife, /FJ7/7a»s

19th Century British Pamphlets icon

19th Century British Pamphlets

80,554 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

own that compulsory expropriation is a tiling which is admissible, and even sound in principle. " LAND NATIONALISATION SOCIETY. Offices: Parliament Ltreet, Westminster , S.W. Object—Nationalisation of the Land—the Land to be held by the State and the Rental to

purchase. He spoke of the enor¬ mous sums which are now spent by municipalities through being compelled to come to Parliament nearly every time they want to acquire land by compulsion. Mr. William Field supported in an eloquent and rousing

Land) Bill. " It was drafted by the Executive Committee of the Land Nationalisa¬ tion Society, and was introduced into Parliament on February 5th, 1904 , by Mr. J. W. Logan , supported by Messrs. Bell , Broadhurst , Harwood

Nationalisation Society and was sent to 420 Members of Parliament with a notice convening a meeting at the House of Commons , on June 19th last. About 50 Members of Parliament attended, and Mr. George A. Hardy was elected to

have been recognised by the chief local authorities and by Parlia¬ ment itself in the most unmistakable manner. The present Parliament has declared its sympathy with this reform by an overwhelming majority, and its passage into an enactment can only

John Foxe's The Acts and Monuments Online icon

John Foxe's The Acts and Monuments Online

638 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

parliament stādeth in force. ¶ Note in this aunswere of the kyng (good reader) that at the graunt hereof, the consent of the Byshops is neither named, nor expressed, with the other Lordes of the Parliament: and yet, the

the parliament standeth in force. Note in thys answere of the kyng (good reader) that at the graunt hereof, the consent of the byshops is neyther named, nor expressed, with the other Lords of the Parliament: and yet, the Parliament

regni. 51. tit. 36. To these recordes of the parliament aboue prefixed of the 50. yere of thys king Edward: we will adioyne also other notes, collected out the the parliament, in the yere next following, which was 51. and

made against prouisors, and not repealed before this present Parliament, be in their full force, and be firmly kept in all poyntes.That the kings counsell haue power by authoritye of Parliament, in case that any man finde himselfe grieued in

statutes made in this Parliament.Ex titu. 9.Moreouer in the sayd Parliament, the yere abouesayd of the king: the 26. of Ianuary, M. Iohn Mandour Clark was charged openly in the parliament, that he should not passe, ne send ouer to

The Newton Project icon

The Newton Project

62 results from this resource . Displaying 1 to 5

as he rose to the highest offices and honours of the state.Mr. Montague sat along with Newton in the Convention Parliament, and such were his habits of business, and the powers which he displayed as a public speaker, that he

as he rose to the highest offices and honours of the state.Mr. Montague sat along with Newton in the Convention Parliament, and such were his habits of business, and the powers which he displayed as a public speaker, that he

was not vast. When it came to putting things into practice, there is precious little evidence of real commitment from Parliament as a whole beyond a modest and irregularly-paid private pension for Hartlib himself. Durham College sank without trace within

was not vast. When it came to putting things into practice, there is precious little evidence of real commitment from Parliament as a whole beyond a modest and irregularly-paid private pension for Hartlib himself. Durham College sank without trace within

had been summoned by order of Parliament. The grounds he later gave for this assumption, of which he was never disabused, were that he had been shown a copy of a sermon preached before Parliament on 17 November the previous

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"Results" © University of Hertfordshire, University of London, University of Sheffield, 2011-2018; University of Sheffield 2019 (www.connectedhistories.org, version 1.0, 1 August 2021), https://www.connectedhistories.org/search/results?kw=parliament