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You searched for: Place: Cremyll, Resource: British Newspapers, 1600-1900

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  • * British Newspapers 1600-1900 * *

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    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    steamer which run aground here some months since, while en route for Rangoon, with telegraph cable, was floated off from Cremyll beach this evening. She was taken into the Great Western Docks, and to-morrow will be placed in the graving Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Victual- ling Yard of Deptfortl took fdie here this evening -wlhen on the point of sailing. She wats beached at Cremyll, whete she burtt to the water's edge. 300 bags of bread were saved. LONDON ANtD NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY. -MEETING YESTERDAY.-Yesterday Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    for twelve months. Hewas discovered on the Mewrtone, and stated that the owner ordered him to take the yacht to Cremyll, where he wouldbe discharged. He weot cruising instead, and the vahht foundered. GvnsVNsrNr CONTRACrS AND STANDARD WAGES.- Attention having Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    tru SHIPPING NEWS. hoa PLYZIOUTI, Monday.ax The Queen Victoria was successfully floated this fro: evening, and has been beached at Cremyll, where she in I will be repaired. Russell's engines were employed. jun ace. LONDON, BRIGHTON, AND SOUTH COAST I Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    (SPECati. TtELl.GRAY.) Seven bodies of marines droweled off Cremyll last Wyailnes3ady have been recovered, the remainlder being not yet iiuil. The Deputy-Coroner for Devon, Mr. Slee- m1no, rcIa lmed an inquest veterday, and the proceedings lasted seven bours-lUhe Drrurvy-Coeomn said Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    . Seven bodies of artines drowned off Cremyll have been recovered, the remainder being not yet found. The Deputy-Coroner for Devon, Mr. Steenan, resumed an inquest onl Thursday, cnd cite proceedings lasted seven hotrs.-Tlhe DEPrU-i-Couoeni saici he had received a Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    -The bodies of two of the marines and one gunner in the Royal Artillery were picked up on W~ednesday, near Cremyll, the scene of the accident. Creepers had been used, and with these the bodies were brought to the surface- Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Mount Edge- cumbe, where the drilling operations were in pro- gress. The men were engaged on a double-boring machine on Cremyll Reef in connection with the Admiralty scheme for deepening and widening the approaches to Devonport Harbour. A borer named Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    were going for ball practice. liL The pity olft in the artillery boat, and were on their way j to Cremyll, but when near the beach, from some UnOX on plained cause, they came in contact with a barge that Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    . BEUT'S TELEGRAMN. PLYMOUTH, MONDAY. 4 The Queen Victoria was successfully floated this evening, I and has been beached at Cremyll, where he' will be re- Pi Russell's engines were employed. RAILWAY ACCIDEZT.. M . (Br ZTECmIC AsD INTERNAnTIo NAL'ETRLEZ Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    the victualling yard to Deptford, took fire here this evening, when on the point of sailing. She was beached at Cremyll, where she burnt to the wvater's edge. Three hundred bags of bread were saved. Baron Ricasoli gave another grand Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    various drills. Their lordships then vsited the Royal di Adelaide, flag-ship to the Port Admiral, subsequently land- r ing at Cremyll, and visiting Mount Edgecumbebpark. ear i Admiral the H-n. T. Drummond and r Childers visited Si : Tregautle yesterday Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    the bodies of the marines drowned off Cremyll on Wednesday week have been recovered. The remainder have not yet been found. The Deputy-coroner for Devon, Mr. Sleeman, resumed the inquest yesterday. The proceedings lasted seven hours. - The Deputy- coroner Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    coming in. The washboard could not be fonnd. Officers sometimes used this boat in other parts than between Stonehouse and Cremyll; but on this occasion they used superior boats- cutters. - The Coroner : If the boats the Govern- ment Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Henry Geake, carpenter, of Stone- house, to Miss Mary Ana Chipman, youngest daughter of Mrs. Chipman, of the Botchers' Arms, Cremyll Point. Beams. At Newquay, on the Gth inst., Elizabeth Jane, eldest daughter of Mr. Henry Rodda, aged 17 years. Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Troon. At Madron, May 20. Zennor v. Maoron. At Porthcurno, May 20, Porthcurno 2nd XL v. Madron 2nd XI. At Cremyll, May 20, St. Germans v. 11. M.5. "Impregnable." At Lostwithiel. May 20, St. Austell v. Lostwithiel. At Truro. May Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Ist January is 1514 inches against 7"10 inches for the like period of 1898. The highest mean temperature was at Cremyll (51*76 degs.) and the lowest at St. Just (46-50 degrees). The mean total hours of bright sunshine was 143-8. Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Ist January is 17*58 inches against 11*29 inches for the like period of 1898. The highest mean temperature was al Cremyll (57*41 degrees) and the lowest at Laun- ceston (48*50 degrees). The mean total hour* of bright sunshine was 2163, Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Sad Suicide occurred at Maker on Satur- day, when William Edwin Marchant,of Maker Farm, and collector of ferry tolls at Cremyll for the Earl of Mount Edgcumbe, was found hang- ing in his own sitting-room, dead. After in- fluenza he Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    January is 19 03 inches, against 1351 for the like period of 1898. The highest mean temper- ature was at Cremyll (64 28 degrees), and the lowest at Launceston (50 50 degrees). The mean total hours of bright sunshine was Subscribers-only content

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