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You searched for: Place: Blenheim, Resource: British Newspapers, 1600-1900, Result number: 140

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  • * British Newspapers 1600-1900 * *

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    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    dust to dust. People have been perplexed to ascertain the principle of this Bill. A showman exhibiting the Battle of Blenheim to a crowd of admiring boys and girls, desired them to ob- serve the figure of the great Duke Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    at St Martin's Hall, Long Acre, y dr bale's Library, Circus road, St Johb's Wood, anud at Mrs lekermaa's, 6 Blenheim terr.ce, were Plans of the Stalls may o be en. MAN AND HIS HABITS. 2 )AILY, at Three and Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Don Antonio Arrom de Ayala, committed suicide by shooting himself near the Home Farm in Blenheim park On his person were found three letters one addressed by him to the landlady of the Bear Hotel, Woodstock, where he has been Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    By the application of what general principle did C. Nero win the Battle of the Metaus, and Marlborough tbose of Blenheim and Ramillies? State the remarkable similarity between-the two Battles of the Metaurus and Ramillies. [Is it warrantable to assume Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    defence, there are the screw blockships Nile, 91, Capt. A. Wilmot, C.B.; Cornwallis, 60, Capt. Randolph; Pembroke, 00, Capt. Charlewood; Blenheim, 60, Capt. Scott, CB.; Russell, 60, Capt. Storey; Hawke, 60, Capt. Crispin; Ajax, 60, Capt. Boyd; Edinburgh, 60, Capt. Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    G. W. D. O'Callaghan; Cressy, 80, Capt. the Hon. G. J. B. Elliot, C.B.; Mersey, 40, Capt H. Caldwell, C.B.; Blenheim, 60, Capt. F. Scott. A considerable augmentation of the fleet is shortly expected. THE MEDITEHnAxEA.-N FLEET.-The following was the Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    are the Royal Albert, 121; Hero, 91; James Watt, 91; Agamemnon, 91; Algiers, 91; Esereld, 51; Mersey, 40; Cscra4oa, 31; Blenheim, 60; Pioneer, 6; Flying Fish, 6; and the Biter, 2. IRELAND. REMOURED BoyAr Vsrr."Tbe report gains strength that Ireland Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    days cruise in the Channel. The other ships at anchor at Portland are Agamem- non, 91; Aboukir, 91; Emerald, 51; Blenheim, 60; and the gun- boats Pioneer, 6, and Biter, 2. The fleet will leave Portland anchor- age, according to Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    reached Lloyd's of the loss oftheship Blenheim, Captain Headley, in the Bay of Bengal, and the loss by drowning of the lives of her commander, the second officer, and eleven of her crew. The Blenheim was one of the fine Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    the Channel fleet, which was cruising a few miles from the harbour. The Edgar, 91, the Impdrieuse, 51, and the Blenheim, 60, remained there in port. On Saturday the Nile steamed out of Cork harbour to join the Channel squadron. Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    however, brought it all right. And although the battle of Fontenoy might not be deemed quite so successful as Ramillies, Blenheim, or Oudenarde, yet it was fought with the essence of right royal pipeclay. No vul- gar running hither and Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    of the island, and wassnubjected to v close and well- directed fire from a 68lb. gun afrop Her Majesty's ship Blenheim, which had taken up a position about 500 yards distant. The result of the firing was satisfactoly and will Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    yards from the Blenheim, a shot struck the boat on the starboard bow, between the gunwale and the water, knocking deceased down from his seat. He fellwith the exclamation, "Ohdear,mybackisbroken!" The boat was instantly run alongside the Blenheim, but in'spite Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    and Neptune, 91 guns, have left Portland Harbour for Gibraltar. The ships remaining at Portland were the Imperiouse and the Blenheim, with the Argus, revenue steamer. The Queen, screw steam ship, 86, has nearly received her armament, and is being Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Barracouta was protecting *British interests in the Canton river, where the civil war made itself felt. The rebels had taken Blenheim Fort, and collected near it a large squadron of war junks. The author witnessed two actions between Chinaman and Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    repairs. The other ves- sels in port are-the Algiers, 91; the Aboukir, 91; the Trafalgar, 91; the Mars, 80; the Blenheim, 60; the Mersey, 40; the Diadem, 32; the Fawn, 17; the Partridge, 6; and the Biter gunboat.- The launch Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    the gunboats Flying Fish, 6; and the Partridge, 2. The paddle- wheel steam frigate Prometheus, 6, and the Coastguard ship Blenheim are also at anchor. The Royal Albert, 121, is daily expected from Plymouth.-The following screw steamers, now on the Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    following vessels: The Colossus, 80; Majestic, 80; Cornwallis, 60; Ajax, 60; Edinburgh, 60; Hogue, 60; Pem- broke, 60; Hawke, 60; Blenheim, 60; Russell, 60; and Dauntless, 31.-The finding of the General Court-martial which assembled at Chatham a few weeks since Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    of sixty-two years. In short, if the right existed, the compromise is a fraud. The descendants of the Victor of Blenheim had a per- petual lien on the Post-office, and it would be assuredly a gross fraud on the part Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Duke of Marlborough, and remained unhung and hidden from the public view till the visit of Sir Joshua Reynolds to Blenheim in 1738; he was so forcibly struck with their beauty and value that he recommended their being placed in Subscribers-only content

 

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