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You searched for: Place: "Clay Cross", Source type: Newspapers

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  • * British Newspapers 1600-1900 * *

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    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    hon, a'i fod yn teimlo yn hollol barod i gyd- Bsynio a'r apel. Di gwyddodd tanchwa. ddifrifol yn nglofa Clay Cross, Swyydd Durham, nos Fawrth diweddaf, trwy ba un yr ofnid i 30 o fywydau golli. Fel arfer y mae Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    an am fyned i mewn. Codwyd cyrif yr oll o'r personsu a laddwyd yn y ffrwydrad yu mhwll glo Clay Cross, nos Fawrth. Mae nifer yr holl farwolaethau yu 45. Gwnaed 30 o wragedd yn weddwon, a 97 a ')lent Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    What would be given to the public safety ? Such a rule would have prevented the fatal accident at Clay Cross, saved two lives, and many cruel injuries. The prudence of directors has been now amply tried and found wanting. Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    Crystal Palace at half-past nine, and leaving at eleven.-The inquest on the bodies of the two gentlemen killed at Clay Cross on the Midland Railway terminated yesterday, when the jury returned the following verdict: " The jury are unaninrously of Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    been recorded,-no, not even ill the pages of the Lacncet. THE RAILWAY SCAPEGOAT. The inquest on the catastrophe at Clay Cross has termi. nated in the following verdict: The jury are unanimously of opinion that the deaths of John Mley. Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    for having negligently omitted the performance of his duty while conducting a train on' the 19th of May, at Clay Cross, on the above line, whereby a collision was occa- sioned., and several of the passengers killed. Mr Adams, in Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    In about three hours aftprwards lie wos discovered about a mile acd a half on the Derby side of Clay Cross tunnel, curled up like a snake between the two lines of rails, and it is calculated that no less Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    MudeYslield. Yorkshire, woollen cord menuactuerJ~y 3, W.CoependTopliffe, Yorkshire, corn miller- Jul 31 D.Smih, heleld con fcto-Juy 1, T. Dove, Clay Cross, North Wingtel, Drbylir, remit-A~stt 9 J.Wroga, Barnsley, Yorkshire, glas bttl ~nuftltrt.-.ugul i, f. louhBradford, Yorkshire, woeol, Birtas.-dOn the 4th, Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    to take his trial at the next assizes. The Derbyshire Courier says, that the wife of G. Fern, of Clay Cross, now working as a plasterer's labourer in that place, has become the fortunate logatee of a sum amounting to Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    C.B.; and S. Whiabread, Esq. The efforts to get out the water froee the MBlack Shale Pit, at the Clay Cross Colliery, have been continued night and day. During the whole of Wednesday and Thursday the eCgines and pumps were, Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    soon after eight o'clock. CHAPTER OF ACCIDENTS. AN EXPLOSION OF FIRE-DAMP at one of the collieries belonging to the Clay Cross Company, on Wednesdaymorning, killed six men and two boys. There were about twenty men in the pit at the Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    forwarded to London alone (entirely independent of a large trade with almost every part of the kingdom), 214,435 tons; Clay Cross, near Chesterfield, 284,916 tons; Lambton, 91,524; Pinxton, 86,352 tons; Staveley, 78,363 tons, Eckington, 76,246 tons; Codnor Park, 74,987 tons; Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    had been | trenched upon to extinguish the loss by bad debts. | rFIFTEN HUNDRED DEFDYSHmIE PITMEN, of the Clay Cross and Stavely Colliery Companies, have been locked out for joining a Derbyshire Miner's Association. The Association I had been Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    harvest. He at o very appropriately pleaded that he had, when working for the Midland Railway Company and the Clay Cross Coal Company, been compelled to labour on the Sanday, or lose his employment. But it was all in vain, Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    addressed by Mr Joseph Arch and other friends of the cause of the labourers at Leamington, Dewsbury, Leicester, and Clay Cross, and at each meeting relief cormmittees were formed to collect funds in aid of the large lock-out in Suffolk Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    the Govan Sehool Board. The Clay Cross Burial Board have unanimously refuse4 Io, to grant permission for a female connected with the Salva. an, tion Army to perform the burial service in the Clay Cross lo( cecuetery. sT 'The idiinburgh Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    was I decidd, on account of the ominous cracks and rumblings, that the quarry should not be worked. The Clay Cross Company in their gigaintic operatiois have carried away a large portion of the Iil, and have conse- quently left Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    THEOPmR5Ls LcNs, Commercial Hotel, Falsgrsave, Scarborough, Yorkshire, hotel proprietor. LIQUIDATIONS BY ARRANGFMENT. GY iarris Lxr, Georgo and Drapgn Inn, Clay Cross, Derbyshire; innkeeper. Liwrs r JOEL and GUsTAvE DUAL, 4, Oxford Terrace, and 1, Craven Strect, Chapel Fields, Coventry, tradnsg Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    was T adjourned. b : A serious explosion occurred yesterday morning, hI at the Parkhouse Pit, belonging to the Clay Cross pi Iron and Coal Company. A considerable number St of men are employed at the colliery; but, happily, all Subscribers-only content

    British Newspapers 1600-1900

    mining lstion are so peculiarly liable occurred to-day at the P ielly of the Clay Cross Coal and Iron Company, at pauesmoor, near Clay Cross, and has resulted, it is feared, .eroua loss of life and great destruction of property. Subscribers-only content

 

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